Tourist Spot

Fraser Island, Queensland tourist criticized for ‘silly’ dingo act


Tourist slammed illegal photo with wild dingo puppy – and he could be fined over $ 11,000 for the “silly” act

  • Authorities investigate photos of Fraser Island tourist holding dingo puppy
  • Could result in a fine of up to $ 11,028 to male tourist for alleged violation
  • Environment Department says puppy appears to look distressed in photos
  • Photos of alleged acts shared by the department sparked a furious reaction online










Photos of a tourist who allegedly broke the law by holding a dingo puppy as a souvenir from a vacation in one of Australia’s most idyllic island destinations have sparked widespread outrage.

Authorities have opened an investigation into the alleged incident on Fraser Island, Queensland, after recent images emerged of a tourist cradling the native young animal while posing for a photo.

The Queensland Department of the Environment said the young puppy appears to look distressed in the photos and confirmed he is investigating, which could result in a hefty fine of up to $ 11,028.

A manhunt is underway to find the tourist (pictured) who posed for photos cradling a dingo puppy on Fraser Island

“We received reports that a person interacted with a wongari (dingo) puppy by grabbing and holding it,” the department said.

“People are reminded that it is illegal to deliberately interact with dingoes on Fraser Island. This includes luring them in for selfies or close-up photographs.

Tourists are also reminded that deliberately or inadvertently feeding dingoes on the island is also illegal.

“Interacting with or deliberately or inadvertently feeding dingoes can cause them to become habituated, which can cause them to approach people for food, thus putting people and dingoes at risk,” the department added. .

The photos of the alleged act sparked a furious reaction online, with the tourist being described as selfish and foolish.

“It’s time to review the law because 11k doesn’t ring a bell enough for this kind of stupidity,” one person commented.

Another added: “Anyone visiting Fraser should be well aware of the rules in this regard, and I’m more concerned with the welfare of the dingoes… people should know better.”

Others have called for the photos not to be mutated so that the suspected culprit can be identified.

Anyone with information about the alleged incident is asked to call 1300 130 372.

Dingoes are a protected species on Fraser Island (pictured) off the Wide Bay-Burnett region of Queensland

Dingoes are a protected species on Fraser Island (pictured) off the Wide Bay-Burnett region of Queensland

Authorities increased fines on the spot for interfering with feral dogs in 2019 after a series of dingo attacks on the island.

The penalties increased further earlier this year, ranging from an immediate fine of $ 2,205 to $ 11,028.

Fraser Island dingoes have the purest blood of Australian dingoes and are a protected species on the island with more protective laws than any other type of dingo in the country.

“Wildlife authorities recognize Fraser Island dingoes may become the purest dingo strain on the east coast of Australia and possibly throughout Australia,” Queensland The website of the Department of Environment and Science says.

At least nine dingo attacks have taken place at this popular tourist spot over the past 20 years.

The most recent incident took place in May, when a four-year-old boy was bitten in the leg.

Several weeks earlier, a toddler had been airlifted from the island to a hospital in Bundaberg after suffering a dozen injuries to the neck, shoulder, buttocks and thighs.

Authorities increased on-site fines for interfering with feral dogs in 2019 after a series of attacks on Fraser Island

Authorities increased on-site fines for interfering with feral dogs in 2019 after a series of attacks on Fraser Island

An eight-year-old boy was also attacked by two dingoes in early February, leading to the closure of two campgrounds.

A previous attack had resulted in the death of Clinton Gage, a nine-year-old boy in Sydney, in 2001.

His death sparked the slaughter of 31 dingoes and caused an uproar among residents.

Clinton’s death was the first fatal dingo attack since the disappearance of a nine-week-old baby girl, Azaria Chamberlain, in Uluru in 1980.

Her mother, Lindy Chamberlain, was initially convicted and jailed for her daughter’s death, but was later cleared.