National Park

Celebrate New Mexico: Carlsbad Caverns National Park

In southeastern New Mexico, in the Guadalupe Mountains, there is a journey below the surface that will make you feel like you are in another world. those early explorers would have lived, it’s just phenomenal,” said Carlsbad Caverns National Park guide Aubrey Brown. Brown talks about the Carlsbad Caverns. You can hike, but we did this trek to the cave from the lobby via a visitor center elevator that took us down over 750 feet or 75 floors in about 60 seconds! We met in the great hall. “The Great Hall is the largest cave chamber in the United States, so for most people it’s the largest cave chamber they’ve ever been to,” Brown said. It’s quite amazing if you take a look around. She said what is unique about this cave is that it was formed by sulfuric acid. From the stalactites hanging from above to the stalagmites below, you could say it’s been around for quite some time. the development of this cave is between four and 6 million years old, so the cave itself existed long before the entrance opened,” Brown said. She said this cave had been known to Native Americans for thousands of years, but a 16-year-old cowboy named Jim White would be the first prominent American explorer to enter it in the late 1800s. found the cave because he thought he saw smoke on the horizon and he followed it and turned out to be bats, hundreds of thousands of bats, which he described like boiling out of this whale from a cave,” Brown said. “He came back a few days later with a lantern all by himself, made a homemade ladder out of fencing wire and desert sticks, and descended into complete darkness. At the time she became a a national monument, it became a national park around 1930. Today we can all enjoy the cave which could easily expand. See the video below. “We are still exploring Carlsbad Cavern, we are about 42 miles away of walkways, last I heard,” Brown said. The park also sees about half a million visitors in a normal year. We’ve spoken to visitors from far and wide.

In southeastern New Mexico, in the Guadalupe Mountains, there is a journey below the surface that will make you feel like you are in another world.

“When you go on this journey, putting yourself in a similar mindset to what some of those early explorers would have experienced, it’s just phenomenal,” said Carlsbad Caverns National Park guide Aubrey Brown.

Brown talks about the Carlsbad Caverns. You can hike, but we did this trek to the cave from the lobby via a visitor center elevator that took us down over 750 feet or 75 floors in about 60 seconds! We met in the great hall.

“The Great Hall is the largest single cave chamber in the United States, so for most people it’s the largest cave chamber you can visit,” Brown said.

It’s pretty amazing if you just take a look around. She said what is unique about this cave is that it was formed by sulfuric acid. From the stalactites hanging from above to the stalagmites below, you could say it’s been around for quite some time.

“The limestone we’re in dates from around 260 to 265 million years ago, around the time of Pangea,” Brown said.

“But the development of this cave is between four and 6 million years old, so the cave itself existed long before the entrance opened,” Brown said.

She said this cave had been known to Native Americans for thousands of years, but a 16-year-old cowboy named Jim White would be the first prominent American explorer to enter it in the late 1800s.

“He found the cave because he thought he saw smoke on the horizon and he followed it and turned out to be bats, hundreds of thousands of bats, which he described as boiling out of this cave whale,” Brown said. “He came back a few days later with a lantern all by himself, made a homemade ladder out of fencing wire and desert sticks, and descended in total darkness.”

Fast forward to 1925 when it became a national monument, it became a national park in 1930. Today we can all enjoy the cave which could easily expand. See the video below.

“We’re still exploring Carlsbad Cavern, we’re just around, I think, 42 ​​miles of passageways, last I heard,” Brown said.

The park also sees around half a million visitors in a normal year. We spoke to visitors from afar.